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Cooling secrets

Discussion in 'T-Bucket Engine and Driveline Articles' started by PotvinGuy, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. PotvinGuy

    PotvinGuy
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    #21 PotvinGuy, Apr 23, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  2. Cole Luke

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    I used some K-Seal and the leak stopped!! Now if I can just find a gas replacement hose...busted a leak on a braided steel hose. How crazy is that?!
     
  3. PotvinGuy

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    That is strange. I use the black fiber braided hose. Much easier to cut and install fittings. Russell 632003: ProClassic Hose -04 AN | JEGS
     
  4. Cole Luke

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    I hadn't seen that hose before. I bought a SS braided hose (Spectre) that's 4" longer than the old one. I'm hoping I can find a place for the extra length so I don't have to cut it.
     
  5. Spanky

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    Wrap it with tape before cutting. Much easier and neater that way.
     
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  6. PotvinGuy

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    Yeah, and use a dremel with a cutoff wheel for a nice cut.
     
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  7. Indycars

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    These bends will less restrictive to flow then the 90° brass fittings.

    FP06_HoseFittingComponentsSeparated_00149.jpg

    FP06_HoseFittingNut_00151.jpg

    I found it to be plenty easy to get the hose inside of the nut, no special tools needed. You can see below how the hose butts up against the shoulder where the threads start.

    FP06_HoseInNut_00153.jpg

    FP06_HoseFittingAssemblyVaseline_00156.jpg

    One hose is complete.

    FP04_PumpToFilter-BraidedHose_00133.jpg
     
    #27 Indycars, Jul 8, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
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  8. fletcherson

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    Put the nut on before cutting the hose helps too. Easier than fighting any ragged strays.
     
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  9. 409T

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    I don't think that is possible unless you push the hose past the shoulder of the nut.
     
  10. fletcherson

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    You may be right. I just looked close at the pics. Those are different from what I’ve used in the past.
     
  11. Spanky

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    Back to cooling, I have been driving in the 90+ degree weather, and have no cooling problems. This with a 3-row Falcon V-8 radiator and 16" electric cooling fan. Engine is a stock 350 Chevy with Vortec heads and mild cam, flat top pistons and Weiand short-style water pump. Transmission is TH 350 with B&M Tork Master 2000 convertor. I run 185-195 all day long, and no overheating in traffic, although my gauge will bump up to nearly 200, it never goes beyond that. I guess I'm lucky! :cool:
     
  12. PotvinGuy

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    Spanky, what are your timing numbers?
     
  13. Spanky

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    I'm going from memory but I think it's 8 initial and 36 all in.
     
  14. PotvinGuy

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    I ask because too little timing is the #1 cause of overheating. Yours is good, but you might get more performance (mileage, throttle response, power) with just a bit more. I have a crate SBC and run 20 initial, 15 speed and 15 vacuum. Idles at 35 (initial plus vacuum) and cruises at ~45 (initial plus some speed and some vacuum), and is very happy and cool.
    A good way to start is to set initial for most vacuum at idle, and see how that feels and sounds on the street.

    Of course one should always sneak up on timing and be alert for knocking. But that's hard to detect in our loud buckets, so better safe than sorry. Hmmm...maybe an aftermarket knock sensor would be a good thing to have. I'll look into that.
     
  15. Spanky

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    Thanks for the advice. I really can't complain about the performance - great throttle response and power. Mileage? Well . . . 10 around town??? Not good, I know, but I can't keep my foot out of it. :rolleyes:
    I've never considered a knock sensor. How would one hook that up?
     
    lincolnuT likes this.






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