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Newbie frame width question

Discussion in 'Frames and Chassis' started by tony67, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. tony67

    tony67
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    I am getting ready to weld up the frame for the bucket. I have the plans for the youngster and also have the plans for chester's build.

    my question is it better to have a taper in the frame from front to rear or just have it the same width fromfront to back. chesters is 25" front to 30" back I think youngster is something like 24".
    I have also seen them built 26.5" front to rear.

    just wondering what the reason for the taper is?

    thanks
    Tony
     
  2. EX JUNK

    EX JUNK
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    Mine tapers from 22 1/2" to 26 1/2" but I would HIGHLY suggest that you have a body BEFORE building a frame. That way you are SURE that the body fits the frame.

    Jim
     
  3. tony67

    tony67
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    Jim you are probably right about having the body first, guess I better not put the cart before the horse on this one. LOL
     
  4. sstock

    sstock
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    Be nice to have your engine as well, especially if you plan on using a mechanical fuel pump.
     
  5. RPM

    RPM
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    I have never seen a good reason to taper the frames, a lot of folks do it. All of our frames are 26.5" wide front to back, no taper. Be careful if you taper the frame in the front. Making it narrow really cuts down on room for starters, alternators and radiators. I saw one car that actually only had about .030" between the starter and the frame.
     
  6. Dirt-T

    Dirt-T
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    I like tapered rails as wish bones leave room for shocks . The area between radias rods(bones) and frame rails.
     
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  7. old round fart

    old round fart
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    A tapered frame doesn't look as fat in front. I know it makes things tight, but I think it makes a prettier car. JMO
     
  8. KAA

    KAA
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    Use 1 1/2" instead of 2" metal on a tapered frame and you should be ok.
     
  9. donsrods

    donsrods
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    But 2 x 3 is so much prettier than 1.5 x 3, the rounded corners vs square corners just looks better IMO. Plus you pick up a lot of strength, especially if you go to 3/16 wall vs 1/8. I also like the fact you can really burn in a hotter weld with the thicker steel. Just a personal preference thing.

    Don
     
  10. TrackTV6

    TrackTV6
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    I had a metal fabrication shop "press brake " my rails out of 1/8 cold rolled steel for me. Then after I had them contoured to the shape I wanted, I boxed them with 1/8 cold roll plate. Lot more work than using square or rectangular tubing, but it achieves the look I want.
     
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  11. sstock

    sstock
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    Would really like to see your frame, do you have any pics?
     
  12. KAA

    KAA
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    I agree. But there's a metal company where I'm at that has 1 1/2x 3 3/16 wall with the rounded edges that looks pretty good. I don't know if it's something special or not.
     
  13. fluidfloyd

    fluidfloyd
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    Rectangular tubing is rolled from a flat strip. The thicker the material the bigger the radius gets.

    George
     
  14. TrackTV6

    TrackTV6
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    299009_2019644687536_159632259_n.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  15. TrackTV6

    TrackTV6
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    Since this last picture was taken, the rear radius rod mounts and transmission crossmember have been redesigned.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. meangreen

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    The design I use to build C-Cab and T-bucket frames calls for 23 1/2" width at the front and 29 1/2" at the kick-up. Main rails are 84 1/4" from front end to kick-up. It gives the frame a really nice looking taper and is the correct width at the firewall on a '23 style body. Fuel pump clearance can be a concern on some engines if they are set too low in the frame. No clearance problems with starter, bellhousing, or steering box location.:thumbsup:
     
  17. EX JUNK

    EX JUNK
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    If there is a clearance problem with the mechanical fuel pump you can notch and box the frame for clearance. Check the attached picture.

    [​IMG]

    Jim
     
  18. all-world1

    all-world1
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    I built mine from Youngster's plan, 23" width (20" inside width) and then talked to him when I heard about possible starter clearance problems. He told me that he always mounts his motors 1 1/2" higher than normal which will likely call for a slightly higher transmission tunnel at the firewall.

    I've already built my frame and notched the body, so its gonna be full speed ahead. Just wondering if one of those Hitachi GM mini-starters that Speedway sells will alleviate the clearance issue.
     
  19. meangreen

    meangreen
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    Here is the diagram I have used for years. I was looking for something in another file and found this. I built my first T-bucket frame in 1969 using these dimensions. Since then I have built at least 8 more plus 4 C-Cabs. This basic design will make a car with a wheelbase of about 96 to 102 inches, depending on the type of front suspension used and rear axle location. With a standard T-bucket body set back against the kick-up and channeled the depth of the frame rails, the frame is the correct width at the firewall. If you are using one of the stretched bodies that are available you would need to lengthen the main rails the same amount as the body stretch.:cool:
    T-bucket frame plan.jpg
     
  20. Dirt-T

    Dirt-T
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    What is the dimension of you tubing?
    Thanks
    Terry
     






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